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Act the First

Scene the first

a Parlour

 

enter LORD FITZGERALD and STANLY

Stanly
Cousin, your servant.
Fitzgerald
Stanly, good morning to you. I hope you slept well last night.
Stanly
Remarkably well, I thank you.
Fitzgerald
I am afraid you found your Bed too short. It was bought in my Grandmother's time, who was herself a very short woman & made a point of suiting all her Beds to her own length, as she never wished to have any company in the House, on account of an unfortunate impediment in her speech, which she was sensible of being very disagreable to her inmates.
Stanly
Make no more excuses, dear Fitzgerald.
Fitzgerald
I will not distress you by too much civility — I only beg you will consider yourself as much at home as in your Father's house. Remember, "The more free, the more Wellcome."

exit FITZGERALD

Stanly
Amiable Youth!
"Your virtues, could he imitate
How happy would be Stanly's fate!"

exit STANLY


 

Scene the 2d.

 

STANLY and MISS FITZGERALD, discovered.

Stanly
What Company is it you expect to dine with you to Day, Cousin?
Miss F.
Sir Arthur & Lady Hampton; their Daughter, Nephew & Neice.
Stanly
Miss Hampton & her Cousin are both Handsome, are they not?
Miss F.
Miss Willoughby is extreamly so. Miss Hampton is a fine Girl, but not equal to her.
Stanly
Is not your Brother attached to the Latter?
Miss F.
He admires her, I know, but I beleive nothing more. Indeed I have heard him say that she was the most beautifull, pleasing, & amiable Girl in the world, & that of all others he should prefer her for his Wife. But it never went any farther, I'm certain.
Stanly
And yet my Cousin never says a thing he does not mean.
Miss F.
Never. From his Cradle he has always been a strict adherent to Truth.

Exeunt Severally

 

End of the First Act.

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